Mystic

Goldenrod on Horn Island
Goldenrod on Horn Island

Walter Inglis Anderson c. 1955 Watercolor on Paper Gift of the Friends of Walter Anderson “To understand color you must relate the color of all the things in nature to a sequence between two complementary colors in the spectrum. In nature on a gray day all things occurred between vermilion and bright green without yellow. Everything in nature was a harmonious sequence between the earth and the young plants growing.” –Walter Inglis Anderson

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Redwings
Redwings

Walter Inglis Anderson c. 1960 Watercolor on Paper Gift of the Friends of Walter Anderson "I am surrounded by red-winged black birds – the air is filled with musical motifs – Day before yesterday the first one found this place. Today there were four and one cedar waxwing, which did not stay. The others talk, scold, sing, flirt, pretending to be terribly afraid – and then asking why the rice isn’t better cooked. " – Walter Inglis Anderson

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Peaches and Sack
Peaches and Sack

Walter Inglis Anderson c. 1953 Watercolor on Paper Gift of the Family of Walter Anderson “Painting still life is one way of repaying the debt which we owe to the earth – all the color, all the form and our own inadequacy in expressing our gratitude is slightly satisfied by increasing our consciousness of the beauty of fruit, flowers, vegetables – the voluptuous return – gifts of an austere mother to her children. “ – Walter Inglis Anderson

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Goldenrod on Horn Island
Goldenrod on Horn Island

Walter Inglis Anderson c. 1955 Watercolor on Paper Gift of the Friends of Walter Anderson “To understand color you must relate the color of all the things in nature to a sequence between two complementary colors in the spectrum. In nature on a gray day all things occurred between vermilion and bright green without yellow. Everything in nature was a harmonious sequence between the earth and the young plants growing.” –Walter Inglis Anderson

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Throughout his life Walter Anderson sought communion with nature. The objects that he left behind paint a portrait of a man seeking hidden knowledge through the medium of art. The artist observed, studied, and participated in his  spiritual journey through painting, drawing, and writing about nature.